Audience

Audiences are an issue that I keep coming back to in relation to The Real L Word. I continue to be curious about who actually watched the show, and who the producers expected to watch it when they decided to make it.

It seems to occupy this weird place in between trying to appeal to the type of privileged queer viewer featured in the show and a wider straight audience. In my experience, most shows featuring marginalized people are about presenting those people to the dominant culture, and informing/educating the general audience about the marginalized group (whether in a positive way or otherwise) is usually a part of their content. The Real L Word seemed odd in that it did very little educating: it was just about the enjoyment we’re supposed to get from watching these people, but it provided very little guidance on who is supposed to enjoy watching them and why they are supposed to enjoy it.

Audience

Flow presentation follow-up

I recently came across two news articles that I thought were relevant to some of the things we’d talked about in class. I already mentioned these in my presentation write-up, but I wanted to also share them with the rest of the class here.

The first is the recent announcement that CBS is developing a new Star Trek TV series for their online subscription streaming service (yes, they have a subscription streaming service!). The second is a news story from August 31st that talks about how Apple is considering producing original content. Both of these really seem to emphasize how popular online-only original television content is becoming and how many companies are trying to profit off it these days, though I wonder how many different companies people will be willing to pay $10/month to before piracy starts to seem like a more convenient option.

Flow presentation follow-up